Speaking in Jersey City: Hidden Histories: African American and Women’s Rights Scrapbooks

Monday Feb. 25, 7 pm New Jersey City University, 2039 Kennedy Blvd., Jersey City NJ

GSUB 129 – Free and open to the public.For more information click here.

Move over Instagram! There’s an old-school way to cut, paste, and share the things that grab you. Men and women 150 years ago grappled with information overload by making scrapbooks – the ancestors of Google and blogging. From Mark Twain to Frederick Douglass to Susan B. Anthony, African American janitors to farmwomen, people cut out and pasted down their reading.

My Lesbian and Gay literature class will be attending, so discussion should be lively!

Joint Event Black History Month/Women’s History Month

Reviewed in New York Review of Books

Gumby scrapbook page of Frederick Douglass

A page about Frederick Douglass from the scrapbooks of L. S. Alexander Gumby – Columbia Univ. Libraries

Christopher Benfey’s review in the New York Review of Books blog of Writing with Scissors, “Scrapbook Nation,” makes great connections between scrapbooks and the writings of Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman. He reproduces some of the Dickinson writings on scraps of paper in the Amherst College archives that I had the chance to see this fall, with Karen Sanchez-Eppler’s class. Gorgeous and tantalizing. I’m so thrilled to have this brilliant and beautiful writer enjoying my book! (And I’m inspired to catch up on his other reviews – enjoyable reading.)

http://www.nybooks.com/blogs/nyrblog/2013/feb/20/scrapbook-nation/

Talk in Manchester, UK Feb. 28

Pass the word to your Manchester friends — talk on Writing with Scissors at Manchester Metropolitan University coming up Thursday Feb. 28 at 4 pm.

Details on talk at Manchester Metropolitan University

First review of Writing with Scissors

How often does an academic have the generosity to write something like this?

“In prose that is clear, unjargony, and occasionally personal, Garvey gets across both the historical details and the conceptual importance of this phenomenon in the history of the United States. Even while I read ideas that were alarmingly like ones I’ve uttered myself (my own dissertation work covers similar ground, and thus at risk of an insecure, jealous, defensive response), I felt comfortable, at ease, and convinced by Garvey’s writing.” I’m no stranger to that “insecure, jealous, defensive response.” How great that PhD student Anne Donlon could be so self aware, vulnerable, and unselfish. I hope we can all learn from her.

Lovely to have this as the first review for Writing with Scissors!

Review of Writing with Scissors by Anne Donlon

 

Book Contest Honorable Mention: “Revelatory and Transformative” and “Witty”

I’m thrilled that Writing with Scissors has received the sole honorable mention in the EBSCOhost/Research Society for American Periodicals contest for the best book on periodicals for the past 2 years. The committee, which included the impressive scholars and editors Jean Lee Cole, Karen Roggencamp, Cynthia Patterson, and Craig Monk, judged it “revelatory and transformative” t the field of periodical studies, and praised it for delivering “nuanced readings” of primary materials in a “witty, conversational, yet erudite style.” Wow!

And I’m so pleased that Jared Gardner’s The Rise and Fall of Early American Magazine Culture won the prize — he seems to be doing a fine job of overturning assumptions about early magazines! I’ve ordered it for my school’s library. Increasingly, libraries don’t order even important books unless we ask them to.

NYC talk on scrapbooks – Feb 13

Wed. Feb. 13 informal talk on scrapbooks – New York Metro American Studies Association, at Hunter College. Plenty of pictures!