Past, Paper, Scissors exhibit in Chicago

Special Collections at Northwestern University  has put up what looks like a terrific exhibit of scrapbooks from their collection, including of course college students’ scrapbooks. I’m looking forward to seeing it in the flesh, though they have generously scanned and posted many online.

Northwestern U Scrapbook exhibit

Northwestern U Scrapbook exhibit

I’ll be speaking at the exhibit on Nov. 13 at 4pm at University Library’s Forum Room (“Reading the Remnants: American Scrapbook History”) and then Nov 14 at a lunchtime seminar for Rhetoric and Public Culture, at 12:30 in Kresge (“Strategic Scrapbooks: Nineteenth Century Activists Remake the Newspaper for African American History and Women’s Rights”). Both talks are free and open to the public. Let Chicago friends know!

Gender, Race and Representation in Magazines and New Media conference

Thrilled to be giving a keynote at the fabulous Gender, Race and Representationcropped-barbie8_v_20jul09_vogueitalia_b in Magazines and New Media conference, at Cornell next week! Noliwe Rooks has done great work organizing it. It’s bringing together scholars and magazine and blog practitioners. Alexis De Veaux speaking on Essence! Kimberly N. Foster’s keynote, “Black Women Blogging Ourselves into Being”! And on a scrapbook note, Caroline Keyser is speaking on “Pure food prodigy: Philippa Schuyler, Celebrity Embodiment, and the Politics of Race.” I had a chance to look at the scrapbooks Schuyler’s mother compiled, now at Syracuse, and am very curious about what Keyser makes of this deeply strange story. My talk is “Hidden Histories: African American Community Resistance to the 19th Century Press” — discussing how black readers undermined and resisted the white newspapers’ and magazines’ attempts to segregate the imagined community of magazine and newspaper readership.

Handmade Books Panel at Columbia Thurs Oct 10 – and scandal!

Talking about Repurposed Books on a panel with Karen Sanchez-Eppler and Rachel Feder this Thursday at 6 pm will be such  a treat! Karen has done such remarkable readings of all kinds of reworked printed matter that I can’t wait to hear what she’s found

Handmade Books, Remade Genres

History Colloquium at Columbia

in a mourning journal. Rachel Feder will take us transatlantic with her work on women’s daily writing and the origins of experimental poetry. I’ll focus on the ways scrapbook makers and others have repurposed books –and the story of a recent book repurposing scandal.

The talk will take place in 523 Butler Library on the Columbia University Morningside campus (535 West 114th Street, NYC) Take the 1/9 train to 116th street. (Bonus: you can get into Butler Library this way.)

Speaking on Scrapbooks at Philadelphia Ephemera event Sept. 20, 2013

Album of clippings of human hair on display at the Library Company

Album of clippings of human hair on display at the Library Company

Looking forward to speaking Friday at Unmediated History — a conference jointly sponsored by the Ephemera Society of America and the Library Company of Philadelphia — Ben Franklin’s old stomping grounds. It will be great to be back there, and to meet some of the ephemera enthusiasts I talked to when I was working on The Adman in the Parlor: Magazines and the Gendering of Consumer Culture.

You can visit the Library Company on Facebook as well.

Philadelphia talk May 21: Ephemera exhibit at the Library Company

The new exhibit at the Library Company of Philadelphia is

Ephemera at the Library Company of Philadelphia

Remnants of Everyday Life: Historical Ephemera in the Workplace, Street, and Home. I’ll be speaking on the history of scrapbooks at the opening, May 21, 5:45.

Article on black scrapbooks on The Root

Why would a black janitor in Philadelphia in the 1870s make 150 scrapbooks? Why would

William Henry Dorsey

William Henry Dorsey

his friend, a black collector and amateur historian, make nearly 400? You may think of scrapbooks as a place to treasure up family pictures, but a century ago, African Americans created histories with them, shared community knowledge, and taught one another to read the white press critically.

For National Scrapbooking Day (May 4), it’s time to learn about how African American men and women saved and shared history in their scrapbooks not long after emancipation. My article in The Root explores the work of one prodigious scrapbook maker in Philadelphia, whose collection aided WEB Du Bois. (And of course there’s lots more about William Henry Dorsey in Writing with Scissors.)

March 27 talk at Massachusetts Historical Society

leatherbee

From Mrs. Albert T. Leatherbee’s Anti-Suffrage scrapbook

Some of the extraordinary scrapbooks I worked with at the Massachusetts Historical Society will be on display there for my talk March 27, 6 pm (come early for wine and cheese). The lively (I’m told) talk, with lots of pictures, is on 19th Century Activists and Their Scrapbooks. Writing with Scissors talk at MHS — sign in to let them know you’re coming.

Speaking in Jersey City: Hidden Histories: African American and Women’s Rights Scrapbooks

Monday Feb. 25, 7 pm New Jersey City University, 2039 Kennedy Blvd., Jersey City NJ

GSUB 129 – Free and open to the public.For more information click here.

Move over Instagram! There’s an old-school way to cut, paste, and share the things that grab you. Men and women 150 years ago grappled with information overload by making scrapbooks – the ancestors of Google and blogging. From Mark Twain to Frederick Douglass to Susan B. Anthony, African American janitors to farmwomen, people cut out and pasted down their reading.

My Lesbian and Gay literature class will be attending, so discussion should be lively!

Joint Event Black History Month/Women’s History Month

Talk in Manchester, UK Feb. 28

Pass the word to your Manchester friends — talk on Writing with Scissors at Manchester Metropolitan University coming up Thursday Feb. 28 at 4 pm.

Details on talk at Manchester Metropolitan University

First review of Writing with Scissors

How often does an academic have the generosity to write something like this?

“In prose that is clear, unjargony, and occasionally personal, Garvey gets across both the historical details and the conceptual importance of this phenomenon in the history of the United States. Even while I read ideas that were alarmingly like ones I’ve uttered myself (my own dissertation work covers similar ground, and thus at risk of an insecure, jealous, defensive response), I felt comfortable, at ease, and convinced by Garvey’s writing.” I’m no stranger to that “insecure, jealous, defensive response.” How great that PhD student Anne Donlon could be so self aware, vulnerable, and unselfish. I hope we can all learn from her.

Lovely to have this as the first review for Writing with Scissors!

Review of Writing with Scissors by Anne Donlon